Tag Archives: Gibbs Crescent

Oxford University’s Old Power Station is a dangerous place

Old Power Station

AFTER the recent explosion in Gibbs Crescent, following hard on the discovery of dangerous seeds the week before, I decided to exercise my rights under the Freedom of Information (FOI) act and ask the University what is stored in the Old Power Station (OPS).

The OPS is a stone’s throw if you’ve got a pitcher’s arm from Mill Street. I’d say the University’s reply is more than equivocal – you can read it here – and it does confirm the place contains many dangerous substances, including the fascinating element we now call Mercury.

Still, to look on the bright side, the University doesn’t have any radio isotypes stored in there.  It probably has asbestos though.  Ruskin used to hold its annual exhibition in there. I wonder if Ruskin College was informed about the dangers of “falling masonry” which prompted the University to obtain a pretty fast anti-squatting order?  

The Valentine’s Day massacre near Mill Street, Oxford

IT HARDLY seems a week ago that I was having a wee in Mill Street when a massive explosion made me almost evacuate myself.

One poor soul, whoever it may be, was killed by the explosion that toppled a three storey house and other houses nearby will have to be demolished too.

The first big explosion happened at 16:45 and was soon followed by a series, a very regular series, of smaller explosions.

All credit to the emergency services – within 10 minutes a fleet of fire engines, ambulances and police cars shattered the normally quiet atmosphere (some mistake?) of this quiet backwater (eh? Ed.)

The fallout from the explosion’s been considerable.  Quite a number of the folk living in Gibbs Crescent have had to have been re-housed, all over the shop.

We suppose that Gibbs Crescent was probably a council estate until HMG mandated that they should all be sold off to either the tenants or to a Housing Association – in this case an outfit called Dominion.

There’s a considerable degree of community spirit here in Mill Street – it’s one of the things I like about living here.  Everyone, OK not quite everyone, chips in.

Shame the Kite has temporarily closed its doors until it re-opens as the Porterhouse sometime in the summer – it would have been nice for folk to gather there – that is if they could have got into Mill Street.

They couldn’t because of the police cordon as the emergency geezers struggled to contain the catastrophe.