Tag Archives: Intel

The Intel Quiz: Now where was I?

I WAS IN JERUSALEM. It’s all coming back to me now. Not Jerusalem as in William Blake Jerusalem. Not Jerusalem as in Israel/Palestine. No.

Jerusalem in Rathbone Place, Fitzrovia. I arrived in a timely fashion only to find that because I was the only person from TG Daily there, I had to be formed into a team.

Luckily, Hill & Knowlton saw that I seemed to know the managing director of Intel UK – one Graham Palmer – and they shuffled me off to a table with five – or was it six – people that worked for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC).

Last time this happened at an Intel Yule Quiz, there was me, Paul Hales and Martin Veitch and we came a very close second to the people from the Daily Mail – seemed to be dozens of them – a very competitive lot.

The good thing is all the BBC journalists are members of the National Union of Journalists (NUJ). We didn’t win. I don’t think. They were a fun lot though. Where’s Jill Franklin when you need her.

Hill and Knowlton screw up@Hackenflacks awards

THE FLACKENHACK awards are some sort of PR gig where the booze runs out early.

I’ve been to one. Lest you have any doubts about this, PRs, generally speaking, despise journalists. Mike Hardwidge didn’t, and Bill Moores doesn’t, but they are totally exceptional.

At an Intel Developer Forum a few years back, my son was standing near the front of the piano bar when one Dan Snyder walked in. My son was then a hack but Dear Dan didn’t know that.

The minute he walked in and saw me, he said “f***** Mike Magee, f***** Mike Magee.”

Tazz is a bit of a rebel. Heck he’s doing PR these days. So when he went to the Flackenhack Awards the other day, he bumped into a spinner from Hill & Knowlton,  a spinner for the Intel Corporation, and asked him what he thought of Mike Magee.

“He’s a f***** t***”, said the spinner. Why’s that, asked my son, faux innocently. “He totally screwed us at the Intel Developer Forum,” said the H&K guy. “He’s my dad,” said Tazz.

Funny how things come around in the end, eh?  Heck. ♥

Would my bum look big in this?

I BOUGHT – yeah bought an Intel t-shirt while I was at the Intel Developer Forum last week.

Because bum doesn’t have the same meaning in the USA as it does in the UK. Bum here means arse here and ass there. Bum also means street bums.  So I was with Rupert Goodwins and he suggested we buy loads of the t-shirts and give them out to the various bums on the street to wear.

Still, at this price tag, maybe we’d be better off organising a shelter or something. Of course with this particular “bum”, Intel is signifying its rather famous jingle, which you can hear here, if you want to.

Bum, bum, bum, bum, bum, bum, bum bum, bum

Bum, bum, bum, bum, bum, bum, bum bum, bum

Silkworms could end up busting druggies

NIKKEI NET has an interesting article today on how Japanese boffins are studying insects to create cyborgs (cybugs?) that integrate electronics with bits of their bodies.

Junpei Kanazaki, of the University of Tokyo, thinks that he can use the ability of the silkworm moth to detect pheromes from a female moth over one kilometre away to detect narcotics instead.

His Frankenstein creation integrates the head of a moth with a 30 centimetre robot to detect the pheromones and point to where the source is.

Nissan is studying the bee’s ability to avoid obstacles in a hundredth of a second and hopes those principles can be applied to future motor car designs.

Mammals, according to Kanakazi, have brains that have 100 million neurons, while insect brains are hundreds of thousands of times simpler.

Kanakazi, however, should take note of Intel’s take on the humble bumble bee. According to an Intel executive in 1998, its CPUs would have enough transistors to equal the number of logical circuits of a bee family member by 2010.  The nikkei.net article is here – you will need a subscription.

If all of this comes to pass, it will be most interesting.

Intel recalls the days of Alpha, PA-RISC and Itanium

TO THE CHARLOTTE STREET HOTEL, in Fitzrovia, to listen to what Intel had to say about its Xeon 5500 (Nehalem) launch and to customer testimonials.

I stayed at Myhotel Bloomsbury, next to a pub, and which used to be a cop shop. I bumped into Paul Hales and Sylvie Barak from Register Two, who were there, too.

Gathered in front of an assembly of British hackdom was Tom Kilroy, from Intel Stateside, who described the launch of the 5500 series as the most important launch since the Pentium Pro.

Ah! The Pentium Pro! I still somewhere have a keyring with a Pentium Pro and cache attached. Intel was forced, as I recall, to re-engineer this chip because there was a problem with the cache. Think someone from Compaq tipped me off on that, all those years ago.

This set me thinking quite a lot. Kilroy wheeled in people from the London Stock Exchange, from Thomson Reuters, and naturally its customers such as Dell and HP – curiously not Big Blue – gave their sales pitches too.

Kilroy was here (left)

Kilroy was here (left)

And as I thought of the implications of what Kilroy said – I couldn’t help wondering, of course, about the Itanium, a question formed in my mind, from whence it came, no one knows.

After showing us various benchmarks, which appeared to suggest that this was the best microprocessor Intel had ever fabricated, we had to start wondering about the Alpha chip “good until 2025” – said Richard George when he worked for DEC, and the PA-RISC chip. Because Intel seemed to be suggesting that this truly was a “mission critical CPU”. Why else would Mark Reece from the London Stock Exchange be there, otherwise?

The Hidden Agenda

The Hidden Agenda

After Kilroy told us that this was part of the “tick tock”  Captain Hook style Intel cadence,  we Brithacks sat patiently, waiting for the Q&A which never seemed to come.

The master of ceremonies eventually allowed a brief Q&A and pointed at me, Mikus Interruptus, saying: “Tom, would you now like to answer Mike’s question about the Itanium?”

Unfortunately my mind had moved on by then and I thought that perhaps a better question was how the financial meltdown had affected Intel’s business.

Said Kilroy: “Certainly there’s been an impact on demand”. The MC said: “Mike, we’re in our quiet period right now.”  Too late!

We finally got a chance to ask our question about whether “Nehalem” was a better chip than the Itanium, but phrased it whether it was a better chip than the PA-RISC chip – obviously with the Power 6 from IBM in mind. IBM was not, officially, represented at this gig.

Mr Kilroy said that the question didn’t really compute, because the Itanium offered stuff like RAS and you couldn’t compare a chip like the Nehalem with the Itanium.

Later, we had a chance to speak to a friend close to Hewlett Packard who told us it had told its customers last September the game was over for PA-RISC. But, we asked, it would have to support customers like the US government on both the PA-RISC chip and the DEC Alpha chip?  Yes, he admitted, that was true. The customers had the latest roadmap.

Do not forget, of course, that Carly Fiorina and the then CEO of Compaq, Mike Capellas, transacted an agreement that meant that, er, er, all things federal about microprocessors – apart from IBM – would belong to HP.

We bumped into a guy called Hugh Jenkins, who now works for the Great Satan of Hardware (Dell Inc). He said that of course Dell still uses AMD microprocessors for some of its server business. Er, BT seems to be an Intel only place, as far as we could tell.

Funny old business this, isn’t it? Intel served bucks fizz (mimosa) at the end. We’d already made our excuses and exeunted stage left before that was served.   

* Spotted from  other Magee spawned websites: Sylvie Barak (INQster), Chris Mellor (Rogister).

So Intel’s Craig Barrett is off

I SEE from both the IT Examiner and The News that Craig Barrett has decided to retire.

Barrett was a master of process, but not particularly good at marketing. His wife is already well known in her own right. The family is obviously well connected.

But he is a courteous guy. I once asked an Intel  man called Yu a question and he turned a little nasty. Barrett is a kind of diplomat.  He said: “I think what Albert Yu meant…”

A gentleman and a dude farmer and good fisherman.